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Ireland Glamping » Main Attractions on Inis Mor

Main Attractions on Inis Mor

Inis Mor is one of the Aran Islands, a group of 3 Islands sitting on the edge of Galway Bay on the Irish West Coast on the Wild Atlantic Way. Each island has its own distinctive feel and atmosphere. They are places where traditions and Irish heritage still thrive strongly. A place you can experience Irish culture the way it used to be. As the largest of the Aran Islands, Inis Mor is the most easily accessible, and is a popular destination for day trippers as well as people seeking a longer holiday.

 

 

The Landscape

The landscape of Inis Mor has a wild feeling to it. A place where it seems that man and nature occupy a precarious balancing act. Countless winter storms blowing over the Atlantic have shaped the limestone rock that form the bedstone of Inis Mor, creating a number of spectacular natural features. Man too has also contributed to the shape of the landscape, where farming and occupation stretches back over 2000 years. Fertile fields are bordered by dry stone walls, and ancient monuments dating back from the bronze age perch on the edge of imposing cliffs. Inis Mor is an island where nature can be admired and explored, and is popular with hikers, bird watchers, nature lovers, and anyone who simply wants to get away from it all.

 

Below are the More popular sights on the Island of Inis Mor
(click on the title to reveal the information)

The Worm Hole (Location for the Redbull Cliff Diving)

The Worm Hole (Location for the Redbull Cliff Diving)
The Worm Hole is an intriguing natural feature located just east along the cliffs from Dún Aonghusa. This rectangular pool looks like it is man-made, but geologists assure people it is a naturally occurring phenomenon. Seen from above, the sea and waves flow into a rectangular pool beneath the cliffs, making it a visually stunning place to experience. The Worm Hole is also a venue for the Red Bull Cliff Diving Championships. Brave divers launch themselves from the cliffs above and into the pool over 25 metres below. Don’t try this yourself though – it’s for professional divers only!. Checkout our Gallery page for more photo’s

The stone walls and small fields

 

The stone walls and small fields
The small fields that are dotted all over Inis Mor are separated by a series of dry stone walls. Some of these walls may well be several hundred years old, and are a testament to man’s creativity and energy in taming the land. The walls and fields can be best seen when exploring the island, particularly when sightseeing by bicycle.

The Lighthouse and Dún Eochla

 The Lighthouse and Dún Eochla
Dún Eochla is another fort on Inis Mor, but one that few daytrippers to the island make it out to see. Located almost in the middle of the island, the fort takes its name from the nearby village of Eochaill which means “Place of Yew Trees”. Two terraced walls surround this circular construction, and it is thought to have been built later than the more well known Dún Aonghasa. Close by to this fort, are the remains of a lighthouse which dates back to the 19th century. It’s a curious place to have built a lighthouse, as whilst it is on the highest part of the island, it is too far from the coast to be of much use! Both the fort and the lighthouse can be easily reached from the main road when touring the island by bicycle.

The Landscape

The rocky limestone outcrop of Inis Mor is both seemingly barren, and yet full of rare flora and fauna, making it botanists dream. An explosion of colours emerges after May, with Bloody Crane’s-Bill, Spring Gentian and Purple Milk Vetch being just some of the flowers that can be found, with many being unique to the Aran Islands. In addition to the flowers and plants, various different types of wild birds can be seen, some of which make the island their home, and others of which are just passing through.

The Inis Mor Seal Colony

The Inis Mor Seal Colony
Inis Mor has a seal colony which has become increasingly popular with visitors to the Aran Islands over the years. It is situated along the coastal road east of Kilmurvey beach, and is a lovely place to visit by bike. On a clear day and with the tide in your favour, you will be able to see many seals bathing. A nearby lake is home to swans, ducks, and some rare birds, making the trip here doubly worthwhile. Pro-tip – Bring some binoculars if you have them. Not only will they be useful for looking at the Seal Colony and bird watching, but they will also be useful when exploring the rest of the island.

The Inis Mór Puffing Holes

The Inis Mór Puffing Holes
The Puffing Holes are a series of holes found at the top of the Inis Mor cliffs, which have channels leading down through the rock and into the sea below. As the waves rush into the cliffs, water is pushed up through the channels and then spouts out up through the holes. It looks like the holes are puffing water almost like a whale does, hence the name! Ask any local for directions to the Puffing Holes, as they are not clearly signposted. Take care when in the general area, as there may be unmarked holes that need avoiding!

The Cliffs on Inis Mor (Inishmore)

 

The Cliffs on Inis Mor (Inishmore)
The cliffs of Inis Mór stretch along the entire southern face of the island and form a spectacular sight. Easy mostly for walkers and cyclists to reach, the cliffs are generally isolated and one should exercise due caution when viewing such areas.

The Black Fort

The Black Fort
A contemporary of the more famous Dun Aonghas fort, the Black Fort is found on the south side of the island on a cliff edge. It is an equally impressive sight, and one in which quite often, visitors may find themselves alone, which adds to the magnificence of the place.

The beaches of Inis Mor

The beaches of Inis Mor
Inis Mor does still have some wonderful beaches. Cill Mhuirbhigh is one example, and is a blue flag rated beach. During the summer months, a lifeguard is on attendance. The other Aran Islands also have good beaches. Over on Inis Oírr, there is a perfect sheltered cove near the main pier. Visitors should ask for An Trá Mhór, or if pronunciation is a problem, simply The Big Beach). Finally, Inis Meáin has several lovely little sandy coves to be discovered.

Teampall Chiaráin & the Standing Stones

Teampall Chiaráin & the Standing Stones
Teampall Chiaráin is in the village of Mainistir (meaning monastery). It is said to have been founded by St Ciarán of Clonmacnoise who studied here under St Enda before sailing up the Shannon to establish his foundation at Clonmacnoise. The church which dates from about 12th century stands on the old site of Mainistir Chonnacht. Several cross-decorated slabs stand near the church. These may be old Tearmann crosses( boundary crosses). The most striking one is immediately to the east of the church. It is well decorated and has a hole in it indicating it may have been used as a sundial. Traditionally islanders draw a handkerchief or scarf through the hole for luck or fertility.

Teampall Bhean’in (St Benan’s Church)

St. Benan’s Church is often described as the smallest church in Ireland! Its easily noticeable position standing on top of a hill above Cill Éinne Bay has made it a landmark for fishermen at sea since its construction in the 7th century. Visitors to the church will notice that it has an unusual north-south orientation which marks it out from other churches in Ireland. You will also notice that the views from the church are amazing!

Na Seacht dTeampaill (the Seven Churches)


Na Seacht dTeampaill (the Seven Churches)
This was once one of the biggest monastery and pilgrimage centres found on the Irish west coast. Thought to have been founded by Breacán, a contemporary of St. Enda, the complex is situated in the village of Eoghanacht. Although known as the seven churches, there are in fact only two churches, with the other buildings having once served other purposes.

Of the churches, Teampall Bhreacáin (St Brecan’s Church) was constructed sometime between the 8th-13th century in different phases. It is known for its masonry work, and has an impressive arch, nave and chancel. The other church, Teampall an Phoill (the Church of the Hollow), is a much smaller church and far simpler in style. Constructed much later in the 15th century, penitential bed remains along with decorated cross fragments can be seen. In one corner of the site, there are some inscribed stones and graves, one of which says “ VII ROMANI” (The Seven Romans). Some people think that this is where the name the Seven Churches may have originated. The complex also had two Holy Wells, both of which are now closed.

Kilmurvey Blue Flag Beach

Kilmurvey is a beautiful white sand sheltered beach just off the road between Kilronan and Dun Aengus. The beach is situated in a cove and as such is not subject to the same strong currents that some of the beaches on Inis Mor are. On a sunny day the water is crystal clear and very inviting and invigorating!

Flora & Fauna

The close proximity of the Gulf Stream makes for a mild and pleasant climate and also encourages a unique mixture of all year round Alpine and Mediterranean flora. In spring and early summer countless tiny stone walled chemical free fields exude the powerful intoxicating aroma of brightly colored wild flowers. Many unusual wild birds live on or visit the Island. The sea surrounding the Island is still startlingly clean and all the beautiful Island beaches are safe and usually uncrowded. The Island is low lying and attracts little rain while enjoying a great deal of sunshine

Dun Eoghanacht

Dun Eoghanacht
Situated over on the west of Inis Mor near Eoghanacht, Dun Eoghanacht is another of the island’s forts. It is thought that the fort most likely dates from the Iron Age, and is circular in construction. Within its two walls are several Clocháins, which are a unique type of stone house.

Dún Aonghasa (Aengus’s Fort)


Dún Aonghasa (Aengus’s Fort)
This is arguably the ‘main attraction of Inis Mor, and rightly so. It is an incredibly impressive semi-circular fortification complex, surrounded by 3 walls some of which are over 6 metres in height. Visitors to the fort should first drop in at the Visitors Centre before exploring the fort itself, which is about 1km away. Due to the uneven terrain, it may be difficult for people with young kids and pushchairs as well as disabilities to reach the site. Those that do visit the fort though will be rewarded with views of not only this wonderful Bronze Age structure, but amazing views from the cliffs.

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Great location and generally a good site. Felt a little unwelcomed when we arrived. We got off the ferry around 11.30am and the first thing we wanted to do was offload the tent etc... Check in isn't until 1pm which is surprising as people coming off the ferry would want to dump their stuff first surely (which they did as everyone else was doing the same as us) just doesn't seem well designed. Anyway we were allowed to set up the tent (so long as we didn't use the facilities) then went off for the day and returned late in the evening. It is a very nice site and the price is very reasonable for camping. Not sure I would stay in a pod for the price though. You could get a b&b for cheaper!
Lindsay Grainger
Lindsay Grainger
09:38 19 Aug 18
Great facilities and lovely, helpful people. Would definitively recommend and stay here again. A great family friendly site. Not suitable for parties.
Clodagh Stapleton
Clodagh Stapleton
19:04 05 Aug 18
€2 per shower, no handwash in the toilets. You have to wear wristbands for the duration of your stay which was very annoying. Also the campsite was very loud late into the night with some residents.
Stephen Crowley
Stephen Crowley
12:49 29 Jul 18
The cheapest place to stay on the island. 10euro per person in tent. 2euro extra for the shower but it's so long working that two persons can use it in this time. The pods are looking very nice but I wouldn't pay this 125euro per night for this, overpriced Ireland as usual.
Katharina Ceta
Katharina Ceta
10:36 23 Jul 18
Beautiful, quiet, across the street from a sandy beach. Huts are snug for 4 but we were outside a lot, so it never felt cramped. Laundry facilities and larger kitchen available in nearby outbuildings, wifi in main building. An excellent place to unplug and rest.
Jill Mulvey
Jill Mulvey
07:58 14 Jul 18
Eco friendly and one of the best stay I have ever been. If u hire bicycle is only two minutes from town. Walking distance is about 10 minutes. Highly recommended. Place is nice and tidy
Eva Ruzickova
Eva Ruzickova
07:10 07 May 18
Nice place to stay, with front sea view and easy to commute to the city.
Brajesh Singh
Brajesh Singh
07:01 04 May 18
Very satisfactory ! Thank you very much ! 😊
Charlotte Tailland
Charlotte Tailland
13:57 02 Apr 18
The welcome was very good. I recommend this place.
Louise Camille Desroches
Louise Camille Desroches
13:38 02 Apr 18
After a hard walking, my friends and i was very satisfising by the welcome the camping had offert to us! Thank you so much
fier d etre moi
fier d etre moi
13:34 02 Apr 18
Very satisfying, they welcome us when we were freezing outside, so thank youuuuuu
Lou acl
Lou acl
13:31 02 Apr 18
Absolutely loved it! Wish we could have stayed longer
Sarah Nash
Sarah Nash
00:03 21 Feb 18
From start to finish I'd an excellent three day stay here.The owner was a gentleman, he unexpectantly to us, was waiting at the port for the ferry to arrive to collect his guests and drive them to the glamping site.Being midweek early October it was quiet with only a few pods occupiedThe pods were first class, spotless, like a hotel room with everything you'd want.The location is perfect, a few minutes walk from the port and Kilronan village with a beach and amazing views out over the water.It was sad having to leave, really looking forward to returning.
Mike Foxtrot
Mike Foxtrot
20:43 01 Nov 17
great staff and lovely acommadations right beside sea.
liam gray
liam gray
00:15 20 Oct 17
Good place to camp, 10 euros a night, 2 euros shower, nice kitchen
Javier Garside
Javier Garside
10:36 25 Aug 17
A must-try experience on Inishmore. Amazing setting and fun design.
Matt Finn
Matt Finn
02:58 08 Aug 17
Free entry to Dun Aonghasa fort offered with stay. Brand new and excellent facilities at time of writing, great location for Kilronan with beach on the doorstep. Only downside was expensive (€2) shower tokens and painfully scalding water from the showers (solar heated, very hot day)! Otherwise excellent.
Daniel Keeling
Daniel Keeling
23:20 11 Jul 17
We stayed at Aran Camping Glamping over the weekend and found it a superb place for a break. The Units are tastefully designed and very clean. The water in the shower was hot, the kitchen room spacious, and it was close enough to the main village. Will definitely return!!
Ciara Duffy
Ciara Duffy
13:40 27 Feb 17

Aran Camping Glamping is conveniently located in the center of The Wild Atlantic Way. It is accessible from both Doolin (The Cliffs of Moher) and Rossaveal (Galway / Connemara).
Sligo Galway  -  Connemara -  Doolin -  Cork

The combination of fantastic Aran Islands self-catering Glamping and Camping accommodation, numerous outdoor activities and famous Irish hospitality makes Aran Camping & Glamping the perfect choice for a short break, corporate day out or simply a family holiday to remember on the Aran Islands.

Aran Camping & Glamping, Frenchman's Beach, Inis Mor, The Aran Islands, Co. Galway, Ireland.

Tel: +33(0)86 189 5823
Email: arancampingglamping@gmail.com

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